february-2013-news

February News

valentines-day-gift-card-contestValentine’s Day Greeting Card Contest

Express your thoughts and feelings about this day in a Greeting Card style. It takes all kinds of viewpoints to cover the true meaning of Valentine’s, so be creative and have fun!

Submissions: 2/4/13 – 2/15/13 @ 11:59pm EST.
Poll: 2/16/13 – 2/22/13 @ 11:59pm EST.

Read More

 

7-word-contest7 Words or Less Contest Winners!

The 7 Words or Less Contest has come to end! The winners of the contest are:

1st) Thoughts- TheReader

2nd) The loneliest- lnolan

 

found-poem-contest

Found Poem Contest Winners!

1st) Invented Past- by Grace C

2nd) coloring- by uniquelylost

3rd) I’ll save it in an e-mail- by Forgewright

4th) Normal- by stargazer5

 

Featured Writing

Survival- by c4a1g

Trophy- by tlhopkinson

Found Poem- by stargazer5

Little Butterfly- by Ritski

Eagle- by Killerelite

Evil Lives With You- by Grace C

Y-gen Haiku- by tlhopkinson

 

Monthly Poetry Tip

When Writing:

1. If a poem is going well, keep writing.

2. Before finishing what you have to say about one subject, jump to another subject.

3. Select words you don’t normally use.

4. Mimic forms and styles of poets you like.

5. Mix the senses (synesthesia concept – hear colors and taste sounds).

 

Monthly Poetry Tip

When Revising

1. Take the best line and start the poem from there, cutting everything above it.

2. Take the best line and move it to the top as the attention grabber.

3. Cut the last line and then use it as the title.

4. Circle all the adjectives and then cut half of them.

5. Remove extra words, pronouns, etc. that don’t add specific significance to the poem.

 

Critically Acclaimed by Forgewright

critically-acclaimed

Giving a review of someone’s writing should follow certain guidelines and etiquette. You are being critical and stating your opinion. Here are some tips for writing a great review.

Reading other critics will give you some bearing on understanding how to properly word and structure your review. Learning by example can help you gain experience quickly in explaining why you feel the way you do about the subject you a reviewing…. Read More

 

Parables vs Fables by Forgewright

parable-vs-fable

Each has a specific manner that is used in getting a message to the reader. There are motives to these stories. Let’s run through a few points that can help separate the proper usage of each of these.

Parables use language with an intent to convey a hidden message or secret meaning that is not contained in the words themselves. The use of human… Read More

critically-acclaimed

Critically Acclaimed

critically-acclaimedGiving a review of someone’s writing should follow certain guidelines and etiquette. You are being critical and stating your opinion. Here are some tips for writing a great review.

Reading other critics will give you some bearing on understanding how to properly word and structure your review. Learning by example can help you gain experience quickly in explaining why you feel the way you do about the subject you a reviewing. A great author becomes great by reading other author’s work. Analyze what they do and learn from them.

“In my opinion” should be avoided. The reader knows you are writing about your opinion. Novice mistake and is not necessary. “I think” is also a no, no.

Knowing your readers will go a long way in getting information to them. A review written for other writers may contain specific terminology that they would understand. A broader audience may be bored quickly with this approach. This is not to say that you can’t educate your readers with well rounded words during the course of your review. Always keep them in mind as you write.

Don’t attack the author on a personal level. A person may take offense to a review about his work. Let’s face it, most of us do, but we learn to accept it as writers. Criticizing the author is rude and unacceptable. Stick to the subject, review the writing not the writer, unless you are giving factual information such as previous books or other relative information.

Discuss topics that you have some knowledge about. You don’t have to be a professor, although it wouldn’t hurt, but perhaps a layman of sorts. If you want your review to carry some authority, then you need to learn everything you can.

Don’t be shy about giving strong opinions. Wishy-washy statements show you are not confident in your opinion and may result in the reader not believing you. New reviewers will tend to hem-and-haw in fear of being challenged. It’s your opinion don’t be afraid to state it.

Give evidence that supports your opinion. This won’t be too hard as the evidence should be there in writing. Give an example of the text from the writer’s own words. Like any good argument, you’ll need to back up your claims with evidence.

Your skills as a writer will help in creating a great review. Being able to tell someone about a problem with their work can take a little finesse. When you say something negative, be sure to offer solutions. Try to balance out the review with the good and bad points if this is possible. Reviews can serve as an edit for a writer to gain insight to the improvements that can be made to their work. Give them a summary close the piece and reiterate your ideas. Keep these ideas in mind when you put on your critic’s hat a begin writing a review.

About The Author

Robert Hatfield hails from mid-western Ohio. Comedy and Adventure stories are his passion. Editing and Reviewing are the fields of work he enjoys. Writing has been an interest for the past 25 years and he now has the time to pursue it. As a Moderator on Thoughtsinc.net, he welcomes any questions or requests for help.

This article is for use by Thoughtsinc.net

parable-vs-fable

Parables vs Fables

parable-vs-fableEach has a specific manner that is used in getting a message to the reader. There are motives to these stories. Let’s run through a few points that can help separate the proper usage of each of these.

Parables use language with an intent to convey a hidden message or secret meaning that is not contained in the words themselves. The use of human characters is most common in parables. Characters are faced with a moral dilemma and then receive a consequence for their actions. Parables suggest how a person should behave or believe. As an example, Religions use the parable to explain their beliefs. A parable is like a metaphor in that it uses concrete methods to illustrate abstract ideas. It could be said that a parable is a metaphor that has been extended to form a brief fiction. Some are believed to be based on truth. Parables give guidance to the young and old.

Here are some examples to better understand. Parables

Fables are a short narrative also used to convey a hidden meaning. The language in the story is not as responsible for carrying the message as much as the actions of the characters. The author will use fictitious characters usually from nature and will give them human characteristics. The lesson is delivered without the reader feeling instructed and gains greater acceptance by the reader. An author of Fables plays an important role in examining morals and virtue in a lighthearted guise and gives instruction of the use of proper etiquette.

Hidden lessons within writings should define one simple action and be interwoven into the narration that readers will all conceive the same interpretation. The use of characters should adhere to excepted universal qualities. A Fox is cunning or a Hare is timid. The characters should have the passions of humans but retain their own special features. Fables are fictions that tell the truth and are often written to appeal to children.

Aesop was a fabulist from 600 B.C. Reading his works can give you a feel for writing this type of story. Interested? Here’s a good one. The Crow and the Pitcher

About The Author

Robert Hatfield hails from mid-western Ohio. Comedy and Adventure stories are his passion. Editing and Reviewing are the fields of work he enjoys. Writing has been an interest for the past 25 years and he now has the time to pursue it. As a Moderator on Thoughtsinc.net, he welcomes any questions or requests for help.

This article is for use by Thoughtsinc.net

thoughts-blue-ink

January 2013 Newsletter

December 2012 Writing Contest Winners

The December 2012 What December means to me contest has concluded! The winners of December’s writing contest are:

1. Winter’s Witness ~SerenaLantha
2. Thoughts of home ~c4a1g
3. A Christmas Story ~Forgewright

 

Thoughts Incorporated New Slogan

The contest to decide our new slogan has come to an end! Thoughts Incorporated would like thank everyone who wrote for and voted in the contest. Without further ado our new slogan is:

create – share – inspire – encourage – discover
-by tlhopkinson

 

January Found Poem Contest

Start date: 1/7/13 – 1/18/13
Poll: 1/19/13- 1/25/13
Topic: Found Poem

 

Featured Writing

When I Was A Kid… -by Night_Sky_of Feelings

Beauty- by SerenaLantha

Drops On A Window-by MyLittleWhiteRose

 

Monthly Writing Quote

There are two kinds of writer: those that make you think, and those that make you wonder.
– Brian Aldiss

 

This is your Brain on Books- by forgewright

Ever wonder what’s going on in your noodle when you read? Recently, while researching how the brain works (It’s just the kinda stuff I enjoy) I came across several interesting articles on the subject of reading and how the brain functions. I’ll summarize these here.. read more

 

Persistence writes a book- by forgewright
So many great authors give us incredible stories of every kind of genre. Famous writers with abilities we can only dream of developing. A writer must want something enough to maintain the motivation to put a story together. Life just seems to get in the way… read more

 

Website Updates
Thoughts Incorporated is now accepting guest blog posts. Accepted posts will be added to the blog and featured in the monthly newsletter. For more information please read the guidelines

 

 

 

brain-on-books

This is your Brain on Books

Ever wonder what’s going on in your noodle when you read? Recently, while researching how the brain works (It’s just the kinda stuff I enjoy) I came across several interesting articles on the subject of reading and how the brain functions. I’ll summarize these here.

Right now the letters, words and their meanings are being compared to what you have already learned. The sounds are processed in your head just like you are listening to me speak. Letters, sounds and meanings appear to be the most active functions in the brain. When you think you actually hear the sounds, not with your ears but with some of the processes you use when hearing. I can agree with that. When I think words it feels like I can hear them spoken in my head, I hope I’m not alone on this one.

In order for someone to be able to read they must be able to recognize and decode the text, translating it into spoken form and be able to understand the spoken language. If you are speaking to someone and they don’t understand you then the criteria of one these functions have not been met. That is why we rephrase what we say. Being individuals that have completely different experiences is the cause of this, not because they are idiots like we previously thought as we rolled our eyes in condescension.

Science knows very little about the functions of the brain. MRI technology allows us to see activities in the brain as we perform tasks. We know what parts of the brain are affected and deduce what is happening. Now we understand that if a person loses their sight because of an injury to the part of the brain that receives the image, they may still be able to navigate an obstacle course. Seeing, like hearing, activates many other areas of the brain that receives information from these senses as well. The image or sound is not received but if the eye or ear nerves function then the brain still gets lots of other information, giving the person some use of that sense. Imagine that!

One function discussed is automatic eye movements required for reading. This is a feature that is required for attention. This difference in listening and reading might explain why our parents said watching television would rot our brains. Television spoon feeds the brain information that requires less attention and we fatigue these brain functions without much effort.

Reading may be one brain function harder than listening and causes us to prefer watching a movie or television so let’s realize this and not become lazy. Reading is one of the most important parts of being a good writer. How can we write well if we don’t know what good writing looks like?

If you want to read all the technical functioning of the reading brain visit: The Brain and Reading by : Sebastian Wren, Ph.D.

About The Author

Robert Hatfield hails from mid-western Ohio. Comedy and Adventure stories are his passion. Editing and Reviewing are the fields of work he enjoys. Writing has been an interest for the past 25 years and he now has the time to pursue it. As a Moderator on Thoughtsinc.net, he welcomes any questions or requests for help.

This article is for use by Thoughtsinc.net

blank-word-document

The Negativity of LCD Light on your Eyes

Do you find yourself staring at computer, phone, or tv screens all day and night? Increasingly the answer to this question is yes. Do your eyes hurt after a while? Do you get headaches? Do you have a hard time falling asleep? Increasing the answers to these questions are yes too. Many people work on computers during the day and spend leisure time on they’re computers or watching T.V. at night as well. Your checking emails, writing, reading, playing games, etc. THEN wait what time is it you ask?.. because you can’t miss your favorite T.V. show!

The concentrations of unnatural light LCD screens produce and close viewing distance has been documented to cause eye strain. Studies have also shown that exposure to high levels of blue and white light emitted from LCD screens and other electronic screens disrupts the human circadian clock by suppressing melatonin. This is because the white and blue light wavelengths are supposed to be highest during the day.

How can you fix this without interrupting your routine you may ask? Computer eyeglasses have been one solution. These specialized glasses have helped you to: reduce the glare, adjust the color temperature (yellow tint). Anti-glare screen filters have been another solution. You place these screen “filters” over your device. They can come in the form of a film or as something that attaches to the screen and the filters need to fit your particular screen. Lastly, manually adjusting the brightness and color tones on your screens has been another time consuming solution.

Well we would like to share a fairly new free utility tool that you can install on your LCD device to help you reduce the harmfulness on your eyes; f.lux. It’s quick and easy to set up; only requiring you to set your time and what kind of lighting you are in. Afterwards, f.lux automatically sets the color temperature and brightness of your LCD screen based on the ambient light around you and the time of day. This promotes wave lengths of light in a much more natural and less destructive way which helps to alleviate some of the problems mentioned above.

Don’t forget to listen to your eyes and take a break!

 

About The Author

This article is for use by Thoughtsinc.net and was written by uniquelylost and Stargazer5. Thoughts Incorporated and the authors are in no way associated with f.lux.